Marquette Organization for Racial Equality

MORE header
Marquette Organization for Racial Equality (MORE) formed in 1963 in correlation with Marquette University's Students United for Racial Equality (SURE). MORE organized inter-racial discussion groups, worked with individual families, and tutored inner-city youths to achieve their goal of racial equality. Although Milwaukee remains one of the most segregated cities in America, the efforts of MORE during the 1960s worked to decrease tensions in the Near West Side neighborhood. MORE's efforts to improve the race relations in the Near West Side helped to strengthen the community due to positive and productive inter-racial interactions.

Browse the articles below to learn more about the various events, activities, and community service organized and sponsered by MORE and their efforts towards civil rights and racial equality.

Solid Sodality Work, March 1965

Solid Sodality Work, March 1965

Description of Sodality and their goals, aims, and activities, including their work with other groups such as MORE, the Milwaukee Welfare Center, Little Sisters of the Poor, Redeemer Lutheran Church, and the Temple Emmanuel for interracial and interfaith dialogues.

MORE News, May 1965

MORE News, May 1965

The article describes the partnerships and activities of MORE, including helping families with tutoring, study days, and transportation. MORE also hosted a party on April 19, 1965 at St. Francis parish for local families.

MORE, September 1965

MORE, September 1965

Article on one a MORE event, a picnic at Grant Park in collaboration with Holy Angels, Divine Savior, and Mercy high schools for the children of the families they visited or were in contact with on July 25, 1965. MORE also held a social event on September 25, 1965, which included a pizza party, Lincoln football game, dinner, and socializing.

A Question of Role, December 1965

A Question of Role, December 1965

Outlines the main roles, duties, and goals of MORE, including it's dedication to inter-racial dialogue and community service.

Say it Loud, November 1969

Say it Loud, November 1969

Outlines the purpose and goals of the newly formed Black Student Union. Their goals include planning a school assembly and a workshop with Campion black students, helping black students begin similar organizations at other schools in the area, such as Holy Angels, Pius, Madonna, St. Joan Antida and others; the Black Student Union plans to begin a larger community union by September 1970.

"MUHS Firm on Integration," September 1976

MUHS Firm on Integration, September 1976

Article describes the impact of Judge John Reynolds' ruling that Milwaukee Public Schools were unlawfully segregated and must start integrating for the 1976-77 school year.

Details the changes to admission applications after integrated busing in Milwaukee as MUHS thought they'd see an increase in transfers saw a slightly lower total of transfer than normal.

Also mentions the attempts to achieve student racial balance with the summer school program and encouraging inner city youths to take the entrance exam.

"School Seeks More Minorities," November 1978

School Seeks More Minorities, November 1978

Editorial on the minority recruitment policy of MUHS. and the value of having minority students. Recounts efforts in the form of the summer school program and informational program to reach minority students in the city, and programs such as talk shows on public television and radio announcements on WAWA. MUHS and President Fr. William Doran, S.J. state the goal of enrolling more minority students.

The article includes quotes from Fr. Doran including, "The minorities have something to give us" and "I have a dream, and that dream is that it would be possible for any student who wants to come to Marquette."